In case you missed our press release,  the summer program at PLN is moving forward at a good pace with the completion of the VTEM max airborne geophysical survey.  This type of survey is used when you need higher resolution coverage of an area and is generally the final piece of airborne work before ground prospecting and drilling.

Generally speaking, you get the most out of a survey like this when you have been able to identify specific areas of interest beforehand.  In ourPatterson Lake Uranium Athabasca Basin case I feel that we are very fortunate because our JV partner, Fission Uranium, has invested over $4.5 million in exploratory work at PLN to date, which means we had a number of targets already lined up for the survey to cover.

The survey was carried out by Aeroquest Airborne of Aurora Ontario and took five days. What we’ll be looking for, once the data has been processed, is basement conductors and/or enhanced sandstone alteration in the northern property area at the expected unconformity depths of between 250m – 600m below surface. As the operator at PLN, it will be Fission’s technical team, assisted by Living Sky Geophysics Inc. of Saskatoon, which will handle data interpretation.

I can’t think of a better technical team to be handling this sort of work. As we saw at Waterbury Lake and now at the major discovery at PLS (adjacent to PLN), Fission has a superb track record with survey analysis. As you can imagine, I’m looking forward to receiving the results and will of course be sharing them as they come through.

We will then follow up on this airborne work with a single line 6.3 line-km ground-based magnetotellurics survey. The goal is to identify and prioritize drill targets for the $1 million budgeted 2014 winter program.

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Ted O’Connor, Azincourt Uranium CEO